SECTION 9 ACTION PLAN

GOAL 1 – Preserve Land for Open Space and Recreation

OBJECTIVES

1A Continue to support the use of Community Preservation Act funding for the acquisition of important open space parcels for conservation, passive and active recreational purposes.

ACTIONS

1A-1 Pursue acquisition of the properties on or near Scargo Hill for conservation/recreation use.

Responsible Parties: Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town has been aggressive in acquiring critical properties through-out town. The town has acquired several properties on the hill adjacent to Princess Beach.

Funding: Community Preservation Act, Dennis Conservation Trust

1A-2 By means of regulatory or non-regulatory methods set aside lands that meet one or more of the following criteria for conservation or recreational purposes:

a. Lands within or adjacent to designated protected open space or potential open space areas;

b. Lands within or adjacent to fresh and saltwater bodies, beaches, salt and fresh water wetlands (marshes, swamps, bogs, meadows, ponds, and creeks), and floodplains;

c. Lands containing vernal pools or that provide refuge to federally or state listed endangered, or threatened species or species listed as of special concern;

d. Lands providing wildlife corridors that allow movement and migration of wildlife indigenous to Dennis;

e. Lands useful for multiple public purposes or enhancement of Cape Cod Pathways;

f. Lands that abut existing public and private recreation and open space lands;

g. Lands that could be designed to promote hiking or bicycle trails;

h. Lands that could allow for expanded recreational facilities in parts of Town presently under-supplied, particularly Northside and Southside, and including lands within existing densely developed subdivisions;

i. Lands providing public access for recreation to both freshwater and saltwater bodies (RPP Rec. Action C); and

j. Lands suitable for active recreation where activities such as ballfields, playgrounds and public swimming areas would not adversely affect sensitive resources, as well as lands for passive or restricted access conservation uses.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Natural Resources Department

Community Preservation Committee

Planning Board

Recreation Commission

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Land Acquisition Committee and Community Preservation Committee have brought numerous parcels of land to Town Meeting for acquisition over the past five years, these have included lands within the Crowe’s Pasture protection area, as well as the Bass River Park and Sea View Park properties. Almost all of the Land Bank purchases were acquired for multiple purposes including one or more of categories a – j.

Land acquisition at Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture was adjacent to past land acquisitions in the same area.

Dennis has an extensive bikeway system particularly on Setucket Road, Route 134 and Old Bass River Road.

Land acquisitions have include access to Cole’s Pond, Swan Pond and Swan Pond River. A gift has provided access to the Bass River. In addition the town has acquired Bass River Park and Sea View Park since the last Open Space and Recreation Plan Update.

Funding: Community Preservation Act, state or federal resources, Dennis Conservation Trust

1A-3 The Town should actively seek to protect high priority areas that are identified by the Cape Cod Commission and town boards as Significant Natural Resource Areas. Local bylaws and regulations including mandatory cluster, increased lot sizes and overlay districts are encouraged to preserve the sensitive resources within the greenbelt.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Conservation Commission

Planning Board

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Town has adopted cluster zoning and has adopted a resource based zoning initiative for the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Area. Acquisitions such as the continued land acquisitions in the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture area are within Significant Natural Resources Areas as identified by the Cape Cod Commission.

Funding: None required as these are regulatory actions

1A – 4 Work with local land conservation organizations to identify, acquire and manage open space to meet projected community needs. Priority should be given to the protection of significant natural and fragile resources.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town Land Acquisition Committee, Community Preservation Committee and private Dennis Conservation Trust have cooperated on lands to be purchased, and land to be placed under conservation restrictions. The trust has contributed significant financial contributions toward the price of purchases of open space within Dennis. The town has also reduced tax assessments on land placed under conservation restrictions.

Funding: Community Preservation Act, Dennis Conservation Trust, Dennis Water District and state or federal resources

1A-5 Encourage eligible private recreation facilities to apply for property tax reduction via MGL c. 61B application for current use assessment.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Assessors.

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status:

Funding: None required

1A-6 Work with the owners of the Aquaculture Research Center and Barnstable County to preserve the Aquaculture Research Center property in Dennis.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Community Preservation Committee

Barnstable County

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: Town is in discussions with representatives of the property owner over methods of preserving the property.

Funding: Community Preservation Committee, Barnstable County, PARC

1B Continue to work with the Dennis Conservation Trust and Dennis Water District to protect lands with important resources.

ACTIONS

1B-1 Prohibit direct discharge of untreated stormwater, wastewater, agricultural and lawn run-off into waterways. Mitigate untreated stormwater discharges through the use of vegetated swales, leaching catch basins and other best management practices, particularly along Swan River.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Board of Health

Dept. of Public Works.

Planning Board

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Dennis DPW has completed a required EPA Phase II Stormwater Plan for the Town of Dennis.

Funding: None required, regulatory restrictions

1B-2 Negotiate with Dennis Water District to exchange conservation restrictions on town and district lands that abut or are near each other, such as at Flax Pond, to assure water quality and permanent open space protection.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Natural Resources Department

Board of Selectmen

Dennis Water District

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town and water district work jointly on land protection initiatives. The town has purchased several parcels for watershed protection at the request of the Dennis Water District. No exchange of restrictions have been pursued as lands are protected by language specifying the purpose of the acquisition.

Funding: Dennis Water District, Community Preservation Act

1B-3 Work with the Dennis Conservation Trust to continue to protect important open areas through-out the town.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Natural Resources Department

Board of Selectmen

Dennis Conservation Trust

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Dennis Conservation Trust is an important partner in protecting the open areas of the town of Dennis. The trust has protected nearly 500 acres of land in town through out-right acquisition or acquisition of conservation restrictions. The trust is positioned to be able to move more quickly than the town or water district on protection initiatives as it is not tied to the requirements of a town meeting vote.

Funding: Dennis Conservation Trust

GOAL 2 – Maintain and improve existing open space and recreational facilities.

OBJECTIVES

2A Compile a list of all town owned open space and recreation properties by agency responsible.

ACTIONS

2A-1 Require each department and committee charged with the oversight of public lands to maintain a list of properties under their jurisdiction.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Natural Resources Department

Department of Public Works

Recreation Department

Beach Department

Harbormaster’s Office

Recreation Commission

Beach Commission

Water Ways Commission

Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: A list has been compiled of all the town properties.

Funding: Town operating budget

2B Determine the maintenance needs (daily, annual or major investments) for all town owned open space and recreation properties.

ACTIONS

2B-1 As part of the list required in 2A-1 above require each department and committee charged with the oversight of public lands to develop an annual assessment of conditions of the property and facility replacement needs.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Natural Resources Department

Department of Public Works

Recreation Department

Beach Department

Harbor Master’s Office

Recreation Commission

Beach Commission

Water Ways Commission

Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: A list has been compiled of all the town properties. The list does not include an inventory of the condition of properties or recommended maintenance or improvement needs.

Funding: Town operating budget

2B-2 Implement culvert reconstruction/wetlands restoration plans for marsh areas around town.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department,

Dept. of Public Works.

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going.

Status: A culvert replacement project was recently completed on Bridge Street, other projects are under design.

Funding: Community Preservation Act, Massachusetts Highway Department,

2B-3 Augment erosion control measures with beach nourishment at town beaches, particularly West Dennis, Chapin, Cold Storage and Corporation Beaches.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Conservation Commission

Beach Department

Dept. of Public Works.

Priority: Medium

Time Frame for Completion: Ongoing

Status: This is a continuing program with regular nourishment efforts on an annual basis.

Funding: Town operating budget

2B-4 Develop natural resource inventory and management plan for major conservation areas, particularly Flax Pond and Crowe’s Pasture, identifying appropriate types and levels of recreational use.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Conservation Commission

Priority: Medium

Time Frame for Completion: Ongoing.

Status: A management plan has been completed for Crowe’s Pasture. The management plan includes measures to ensure the continued viability of the grass-lands on the property.

Funding: Town, AmeriCorps and County

2B-5 Create wildlife habitat enhancement measures at Simpkins Neck, including cleared patches and plantings.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department,

Priority: Medium

Time Frame for Completion: Ongoing.

Status:

Funding: Town, AmeriCorps and County

2B-6 Design more formal parking area at Simpkins Neck.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department,

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: 2003.

Status: The Natural Resources Department continues to try to address this issue.

Funding: Town, AmeriCorps and County

2B-7 Deputize appropriate town officials, including health agents, in addition to police and harbormasters, to bolster enforcement of MGL c. 270, s. 16, preventing illegal dumping on public land.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department,

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: 2005

Status: On-going

Funding: None required

2B-8 Encourage non-profit groups, such as the Dennis Conservation Trust, and Adopt-A-Beach volunteers to organize land clean-ups of public and private open space.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Natural Resources Department

Beach Dept.

Priority: Medium

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Beach Department has adopted a beach clean-up procedure for the Adopt-a-Beach Program. Volunteers in the program collect trash on a regular basis on the town beaches to supplement efforts by the Dennis DPW.

Funding: None required

2B-9 Evaluate landfill/transfer station fees and collection policies to discourage residents from disposing of bulk items in unauthorized areas. Explore alternative means of legal disposal.

Responsible Parties: Board of Selectmen

Board of Health

Dept. of Public Works.

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going.

Status: The town constantly reviews its landfill policies and procedures as it relates to trash collection and the impacts the fee and operating hours may have on illegal dumping.

Funding: Town operating budget

2B-10 Regulate motorized and non-motorized bicycle use on identified nature trails.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Conservation Commission

Dennis Police Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: Illegal vehicle use on town trails is a significant problem The Natural Resources Department and Dennis Police Department are faced with constant efforts to control these illegal activities.

Funding: None required

2B-11 Develop a maintenance schedule for the dredging of all town waters based upon sediment flow and water current factors.

Responsible Parties: Harbormaster’s Office

Board of Selectmen

Dennis Police Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Harbormaster has prepared a plan that has been presented to the Dennis Board of Selectmen. The plan’s implementation aspects are found in below under 2C-4 and 2C-5.

Funding: See below

2C As part of the town budgetary process identify a dedicated funding level to provide for the proper levels of maintenance for these parcels.

ACTIONS

2C-1 Identify a portion of the town Department of Public Works Budget to be dedicated to daily upkeep of town properties.

Responsible Parties: Department of Public Works

Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: A committee has been established to assess the regular maintenance needs of town facilities, the committee has met several times, however no final recommendations have been made.

Funding: Town operating budget

2C-2 Identify a portion of the town Department of Public Works Budget to be dedicated to daily upkeep of town properties. Identify a portion of the Capital Improvement Program funding to be dedicated to on-going capital facility maintenance at all town properties.

Responsible Parties: Department of Public Works

Natural Resources Department

Beach Department

Recreation Department

Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The annual capital improvement program process includes requests for large capital projects. This process needs to be adjusted to ensure that categories of maintenance can expect to receive certain assured annual funding (i.e. vehicle replacement, facility maintenance etc.).

Funding: Town operating budget

2C-3 Develop a Parks Committee to work with the Department of Public Works and Board of Selectmen to identify on-going needs for maintenance and improvements to town lands and parks, to assist in the prioritization of these needs, and to work on behalf of dedicating funding for these needs.

Responsible Parties: Department of Public Works

Natural Resources Department

Beach Department

Recreation Department

Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: 2009

Status:

Funding: None required

2C-4 Develop a budget for annual dredging to be undertaken to maintain access to town waterways.

Responsible Parties: Dennis Harbormaster

Natural Resources Department

Barnstable County

Beach Department

Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status:

Funding: Town, County, Total Cost: $4,606,000

2C-5 Acquire town owned dredge to maintain access to town waterways.

Responsible Parties: Dennis Harbormaster

Barnstable County

Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: 2012

Status:

Funding: Town, County, Capital: $800,000 Operating: $28,800

Operating costs are estimated labor, fuel, etc. does not include associated costs of moving deposits, i.e. loading, trucking, etc.

GOAL 3 – Provide funding to implement the priority facility needs identified by the town Open Space and Recreation Plan Survey.

OBJECTIVES

3A Provide bicycle facilities as part of all roadway or sidewalk improvement projects.

ACTIONS

3A-1 Work cooperatively to develop bike paths and walking trails linking various outdoor and recreation facilities.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Dept. of Public Works

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Dennis DPW includes bicycle and pedestrian facilities in all of its roadway construction projects. The DPW also has constructed a number of new bicycle pedestrian facilities alongside major roads in town.

Funding: Town capital improvement budget, Massachusetts Highway Department

3A-2 Develop the railroad bed west of Route 134 as a recreational corridor.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Dept. of Public Works

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town is working with the Cape Cod Commission and the Town of Yarmouth on the extension of the Cape Cod Rail Trail to the west.

Funding: Massachusetts Highway Department

3A-3 The Town should continue to work with the Commission to identify and designate suitable locations for bicycling facilities to further the Cape Cod Bikeways program Install additional bicycle racks at beaches, parks and in commercial areas.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Dept. of Public Works

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status:

Funding: Town capital improvement budget, Massachusetts Highway Department, Cape Cod Commission

3B Improve public access to the water for fishing and boating by identifying town owned parcels which can provide varying levels of access depending on the environmental conditions on the site and water body conditions.

ACTIONS

3B-1 Focus land acquisition efforts on opportunities for increased pond and saltwater access lands.

Responsible Parties: Board of Selectmen

Community Preservation Committee

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Community Preservation Committee and Land Acquisition Committee have this as a continuing priority. Our recent purchases include Sea View Park, Bass River Park, Crowe’s Pasture, the Hibbert property, the Gomes Parcel and Coursey Parcel all contain waterfront access.

Funding: Town, AmeriCorps

3C Providing local neighborhood parks throughout the town. In particular in reviewing the disposition of tax title properties in relation to the possibility of meeting localized recreational needs.

ACTIONS

3C-1 Develop design plans with cost estimates for outdoor play fields, tennis courts.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town’s five year Capital Improvement Program list for the Recreation Department includes cost estimates for these type of facilities on town properties.

Funding: Town operating budget

3C-2 Develop additional facilities, distributed evenly through town, particularly for baseball, basketball and tennis.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: ongoing

Status: Two new tennis courts and one new playground have been developed. The Five Year Capital Improvement Program includes funding requests for additional facilities and repairs to existing facilities.

Funding: Town capital improvement budget

3C-3 Cooperate with nearby towns, particularly Harwich, in exploring options for regional, year-round indoor public swimming pool.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town was working with the Cape Cod YMCA for several years on the possibility of a new YMCA facility being constructed in Dennis. The YMCA has instead chosen to expand its facilities in Barnstable. The town will now shift its focus on other local or regional efforts.

Funding: Town operating and capital improvement budgets

3D Identify a funding source for the long planned recreation center building.

ACTIONS

3D-1 Continue to pursue alternative means of funding to design and construct an indoor community/recreation center, probably located at Kelley Park or the closed landfill. Seek state Urban Self-Help reimbursement and other sources to augment town funds.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: ongoing

Status: The Recreation Department has completed a master plan for improvements to Johnny Kelley Park. These improvements include a cost estimate for the construction of a new recreation facility. The construction is targeted for within the next five years, however, that is limited by available funding sources for the construction.

Funding: Town capital improvement program – Proposition 2 ½ debt exclusion

3E. Identify a funding source for the upgrade to, or replacement of, the Dennis Senior Center, possibly in coordination with item 3D above.

ACTIONS

3E-1 Continue to pursue alternative means of funding to design and construct either the upgrade and expansion to the existing Dennis Senior Center or construct a new facility, possible in coordination with the planned indoor community/recreation center discussed above, probably located at Kelley Park or the closed landfill. Seek state or federal funding, including Community Development Block Grant funding to augment town funds.

Responsible Parties: Council on Aging

Friends of Dennis Seniors

Recreation Department

Board of Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: ongoing

Status: The Friends of Dennis Seniors have engaged a consultant to develop preliminary plans for an expanded Senior Center

Funding: Town capital improvement program – Proposition 2 ½ debt exclusion; Friends of Dennis Seniors

GOAL 4 – Preserve the Historic and Scenic Character of the Town

OBJECTIVES

4A Retain and promote agricultural lands and uses in Dennis

ACTIONS

4A-1 Promote the use of Chapter 61 protections for existing farms.

Responsible Parties: Agricultural Commission

Assessors

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: ongoing

Status: The town has an aggressive farmland program for including the limited remaining eligible farms in the Chapter 61 protections. The town has also adopted a Right to Farm By-law as well as has created an Agricultural Commission to promote agricultural interests in town.

Funding: None required

4B Retain and protect natural, historic, scenic and archeological resources in Dennis.

ACTIONS

4B-1 Encourage use of construction and design standards contained in “Designing the Future to Honor the Past: Design Guidelines for Cape Cod,” Cape Cod Commission, 1994.

Responsible Parties: Planning Board

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The recently adopted design standards within the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District are intended to protect the scenic qualities of Cape Cod as established in the “Designing the Future to Honor the Past. In addition the town has adopted design guidelines for both the Dennisport Village Center and the West Dennis Village Center districts. These design guidelines tie future development to the historical village look. Also, Dennis became only the second town in the Commonwealth in 2007 to adopt restrictions on Formula Based Businesses. These restrictions will force formula businesses to comply with Cape Cod design standards over national chain design standards.

Funding: None required

4B-2 Where feasible, require placement of new utility lines underground.

Responsible Parties: Planning Board

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town Subdivision Regulations require new utilities to be placed underground.

Funding: None required

4B-3 Implement local recommendations of Route 6A Corridor Management Plan.

Responsible Parties: Planning Board

Historic Commission

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The recently adopted design standards within the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District, including the protections afforded the Scenic Vista Area within the district are intended to protect the scenic qualities identified in the Route 6A Corridor Management Plan.

Funding: None required

4B-4. Where appropriate, the Town should encourage land owners to restore blighted or abandoned areas to open space, whether it be to landscaped parks or natural areas

Responsible Parties: Planning Board

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town has acquired an old gas station on Route 6A and restored it to a park. The town has also acquired the former Howlin’ Howies property and has cleared that site of the structures restoring the view of the water across the site.

Funding: Community Preservation Act, Dennis Conservation Trust, private funds

4B-5 Continue to preserve land along Bass River, particularly parcels between Highbank Road and Follins Pond.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town has acquired several parcels along the Bass River including the former Howlin’ Howies property.

Funding: Community Preservation Act, Dennis Conservation Trust

4B-6 Install proper signage and covenants to protect public usage of ancient ways.

Responsible Parties: Planning Board

Selectmen

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status:

Funding: Town operating budget

4B-7 Continue to study regulatory and non-regulatory measures to protect the scenic vistas within the town that attracts visitors to the area.

Responsible Parties: Planning Board

Zoning By-law Study Committee

Conservation Commission

Community Preservation Act Committee

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town has adopted scenic vista protections in zoning for the Crowe’s Pasture and Quivet Creek area. The town has also acquired significant acreage located within the scenic vista areas.

Funding: Community Preservation Act

GOAL 5 – Protect and Enhance Drinking Water Supplies

OBJECTIVES

5A Protect water supply from pollution.

ACTIONS

5A-1 Prohibit direct discharge of untreated stormwater and wastewater into waterways. Mitigate untreated stormwater discharges through the use of vegetated swales, leaching catch basins and other best management practices, particularly along Swan River.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Board of Health

Dept. of Public Works.

Planning Board

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Dennis DPW has completed a required EPA Phase II Stormwater Plan for the Town of Dennis.

Funding: None required

5A-2 Negotiate with Dennis Water District to exchange conservation restrictions on town and district lands that abut or are near each other, such as at Flax Pond, to assure water quality and permanent open space protection.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Natural Resources Department

Board of Selectmen

Dennis Water District

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town and water district work jointly on land protection initiatives. The town have purchased several parcels for watershed protection at the request of the Dennis Water District. No exchange of restrictions have been pursued as lands are protected by language specifying the purpose of the acquisition.

Funding: Dennis Water District, Community Preservation Act

5A-3 Encourage natural landscaping (xeriscaping) and the reduction in the use of fertilizers, sprinklers and chemical fertilizing of residential and agricultural lands.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Dennis Water District

Agricultural Committee

Board of Health

Dept. of Public Works.

Planning Board

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: Xeriscaping recommendations have been included in the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture zoning requirements; the town has been adopting xeriscaping for town lands to reduce watering and cutting requirements

Funding: None required

5B Acquire critical land areas.

ACTIONS

5B-1 Acquire lands within Zone II areas that may threaten the quality of the Dennis Water Supply

Responsible Parties: Dennis Water District

Community Preservation Act Committee

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town and water district have acquired nearly 1,000 acres of land within the Dennis Water Shed.

Funding: Dennis Water District, Community Preservation Act, Dennis Conservation Trust

GOAL 6: Enhance Recreational Opportunities Appropriate and Accessible to All Age Groups

OBJECTIVES

6A Improve and increase recreational facilities, public and private, to meet current and future needs.

ACTIONS

6A-1 Pending acquisition of additional beachfront, continue to study feasibility of siting an off-site parking facility and shuttle service for Southside beaches in summer.

Responsible Parties: Selectmen

Recreation Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status:

Funding: Town operating budget

6A-2 The Town should continue its work with the Cape Cod Pathways Partners and the Commission to further identify, designate and acquire, through purchase or easement, suitable locations for walking paths that comprise the Cape Cod Pathways network. Promote Cape Cod Pathways as an off-season tourist attraction as well as year-round recreational network.

Responsible Parties: Conservation Commission

Recreation Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status:

Funding: Community Preservation Act, Dennis Conservation Trust, State and Federal Funding

6A-3 Recognize and protect ancient ways for public use during subdivision approval process.

Responsible Parties: Planning Board

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: Town Subdivision Regulations require all subdivision filings to illustrate the location of all ancient ways and trails.

Funding: None required

6B Improve access to recreational facilities in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

ACTIONS

6B-1 Ensure that any new recreational facilities include design specifications that incorporate accessibility codes.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The West Dennis Beach Bath House has been made accessible.

Funding: Town capital improvement program, beach improvement fund

6B-2 Prioritize list of accessibility upgrades and determine costs needed for existing facilities, based on inventory in the Local Comprehensive Plan.

Responsible Parties: Recreation Department

Natural Resources Dept.

Beach Dept.

Engineering

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: ongoing

Status: All facility improvements are planned to improve ADA accessibility to the site in question.

Funding: Town capital improvement program, beach improvement fund

6C Control recreational uses to protect the integrity of land and water resources.

ACTIONS

6C-1 Review health-related issues with respect to dogs on public bathing beaches.

Responsible Parties: Board of Health

Beach Dept.

Priority: Medium

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status:  No dogs are allowed on town beaches between Memorial Day and Labor Day.

“Mutt Mitts” are made available by the town Conservation Commission.

Funding: Town operating budget

6C-2 Consider nomination of portions of waterways as federal EPA No Discharge areas for boats. Coordinate with regional health officials on marine head pumping options.

Responsible Parties: Harbormaster

Board of Health

Conservation Commission

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: 2002

Status: Adopted by Selectmen. The town also worked with state and federal officials on the designation of Cape Cod Bay as a No Discharge Area. The town has constructed a pump-out facility as Sesuit Harbor.

Funding: None required completed

6C-3. Investigate pump-out facility for Bass River boaters, perhaps in conjunction with Yarmouth.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Harbormaster.

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: Bass River Marina, a private facility on the Bass River, has a pump-out facility. Pump-outs are provided free of charge as the marina gets a 75% reimbursement under the state Clean Vessel Act.

Funding: None required, completed

GOAL 7: Promote a Cooperative and Regional Approach to Open Space and Resource Protection

OBJECTIVES

7A Assure collective and cooperative commitment by town departments, boards and staff to accomplish the objectives of this open space plan.

ACTIONS

7A-1 Ensure that all departments and relevant boards have copies of the Open Space and Recreation Plan

Responsible Parties: Planning Department

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Open Space and Recreation Plan is distributed to all departments and commissions.

Funding: None required

7B Coordinate Dennis open space and recreational planning with actions and programs on a regional basis.

ACTIONS

7B-1 Continue to work with the town of Brewster on water supply protection measures.

Responsible Parties: Dennis Water District

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The Water District has purchased 62 acres of land in the Town of Brewster with the support of the Brewster Selectmen for Water Supply Protection.

Funding: None required

7B-2 Continue to work with the Town of Yarmouth to identify and implement solutions to the nitrogen loading issue associated with eutrophication of the Upper Bass River.

Responsible Parties: Natural Resources Department

Conservation Commission

Board of Health.

CWMP Steering Committee

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: The town is working on its CWMP. The CWMP will include an analysis of the estuaries in town, in particular the Bass River for Nitrogen Loading.

Funding: None required

7C Ensure appropriate consistency between Dennis open space and recreational planning and the Cape Cod Commission Regional Policy Plan.

ACTIONS

7C-1 Coordinate activities with the Cape Cod Commission as required.

Responsible Parties: Planning Department

Natural Resources Department

Conservation Commission

Board of Health.

Priority: High

Time Frame for Completion: On-going

Status: See Below

Funding: None required

REGIONAL POLICY PLAN GOALS AND POLICIES

Land Use/Growth Management

1.1 Goal: To encourage growth and development consistent with the carrying capacity of Cape Cod’s natural environment in order to maintain the Cape’s economic health and quality of life through the enhancement of existing village and regional centers that provide a pedestrian oriented and transit accessible environment for living, working, and shopping for residents and visitors. (RPP Goal 1.1)

Minimum Performance Standards

1.1.1 New development shall be located and designed to promote redevelopment and infill within Growth/Activity Centers and Growth Incentive Zones, and, where appropriate, compact mixed-use residential/ commercial areas.

Accomplishments:

· The Town of Dennis has adopted two village center by-laws, West Dennis and Dennisport. These two by-law provide significant density incentives to encourage development to occur within these centers. Connected to both of these rezonings, has been the acquisition significant open space parcels for protection, Sea View Park in Dennisport and the former Howlin’ Howies property in West Dennis.

· The town adopted significant down-zoning in the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District to manage the potential for over-development of this critical environmental resource. The zoning for this district specifically addressed sensitive environmental factors and adopted density standards tied directly to the carrying capacity of these lands.

1.2 Goal: To protect open space and minimize environmental and community impacts of growth and to promote compact forms of residential and commercial development.

Minimum Performance Standards

1.2.1 All residential subdivisions of five or more lots shall cluster the proposed development unless inconsistent with local bylaws. Cluster plans shall use site designs that maximize contiguous open space, respect the natural topography and character of the site, and employ wastewater treatment alternatives to allow more compact development.

1.2.3 Development and redevelopment shall be directed away from Significant Natural Resource Areas as illustrated on the Cape Cod Significant Natural Resource Areas Map dated January 10, 2002, as amended.

1.2.4 The creation of affordable housing for both ownership and rental should be encouraged through infill, redevelopment or conversion of existing structures and sites, and the creation of accessory apartments. Adequate infrastructure should support these efforts in order to accommodate greater residential density.

1.2.5 Appropriate redevelopment and infill within Growth/Activity Centers and Growth Incentive Zones should be encouraged. The development of land in outlying areas should be reduced through downzoning, Transfer of Development Rights, open space purchases, or other techniques.

1.2.6 Efforts should be made to improve the appearance of existing strip development through frontage buildings, sign control, infill, relocation of parking, landscaping, and undergrounding of utilities, consistent with the recommendations of Designing the Future to Honor the Past: Design Guidelines for Cape Cod, Technical Bulletin 96-001.

1.2.7 For those areas determined by Local Comprehensive Plans or site assessments to be unsuitable for redevelopment where existing strip development exists, efforts should be made to remove such development, revegetate the site, and put in place permanent conservation restrictions for the purpose of reducing/mitigating the impacts of growth, removing traffic conflicts, reducing wastewater impacts, or restoring sensitive resource lands.

Accomplishments:

· The Town of Dennis adopted cluster regulations governing residential development in 1983. While mandating cluster, the by-law encourages cluster by providing density bonuses for its use. In addition, the town adopted additional cluster provisions for the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection Area which provides a 10% density bonus for projects choosing cluster development over traditional development.

· The Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District was adopted to protect significant environmentally and archeologically sensitive areas from over-development. The by-law was crafted in a fashion to match development densities to the carrying capacity of the land.

· The town and water district have been aggressive partners in the acquisition of land to protect natural resources and the town water supply from the impacts of inappropriate land uses and over development.

· Section 4.9 the Dennis Affordable Housing By-law, Section 8 the Dennisport Village Center and Section 9 West Dennis Village Center sections of the Dennis Zoning By-law all encourage the creation of affordable housing within mixed use centers, the re-use of existing structures and the creation of accessory housing on already developed properties. These by-laws have jointly created 59 affordable housing units to date, 54 of which were created on previously developed properties.

· The town has adopted two village center by-laws to promote in-fill development in the urban villages of Dennis. In addition, the town has acquired significan amounts of empty properties for open space protection within less than a mile of these villages.

· The Town of Dennis is the first town on the Cape, and only the second town in the Commonwealth, to adopt regulations to restrict the development of Formula Based Businesses. Through this by-law the town has taken control over the spread of the “Anywhere USA” land use patterns and designs associated with chain retail and restaurant development, giving the town the upper hand on ensuring design sensitive land use patterns in most of Dennis.

· The town has acquired and undeveloped two parcels, Sea View Park and the former Howlin’ Howies property. The structures have been removed from both of these properties and restoration of environmentally appropriate vegetation is in the process of being restored for the property. Both properties have been placed under restrictions to control future uses for open space and limited recreational uses.

1.3 Goal: To preserve and enhance rural land uses, including agriculture, that are environmentally compatible with the Cape’s natural resources in order to maintain opportunities to enjoy the traditional occupations, economic diversity, and scenic resources associated with rural lands.

Accomplishments

· At the May 2008 Town Meeting the Town of Dennis adopted a Right to Farm By-law and created an Agricultural Commission to protect and represent agricultural interests in the town.

Water Resources

2.1.1 Goal: To maintain the overall quality and quantity of Cape Cod’s groundwater to ensure a sustainable supply of untreated high-quality drinking water and to preserve and restore the ecological integrity of marine and fresh surface waters.

Minimum Performance Standards

2.1.1.8 Development and redevelopment should utilize alternatives to synthetic chemical fertilizers and pesticides in favor of organic and biological methods.

2.1.1.13 Development in USGS-identified Potential Water Supply Areas should be avoided.

Accomplishments:

· As part of the town’s Comprehensive Waste Water Management Plan the town and water district have been promoting alternatives to chemical fertilizers.

· The town and the water district have a mutually compatible, aggressive program to acquire lands necessary for water supply protection. This includes recent acquisitions by the Water District of large land holdings in the Town of Brewster to protect the local water supply.

2.1.2 Goal: To encourage the use of public and private sewage treatment facilities in appropriate areas where they will provide environmental or other public benefits and where they can be adequately managed and maintained.

Minimum Performance Standards

2.1.2.2 All public and private sewage treatment facilities shall be designed to achieve tertiary treatment with denitrification that meets a maximum 5-ppm total nitrogen discharge standard either through advanced treatment to achieve 5 ppm in the effluent or 5 ppm in groundwater at the downgradient property boundary.

2.1.2.8 When allowing additional development in areas where existing high-density development or large numbers of failing septic systems have led to public health or water quality problems, the Commission and/or towns may require PSTFs or DEP-approved alternative systems with enhanced nitrogen removal to be installed as a remedial measure.

Accomplishments

· The Board of Health and the Conservation Commission strictly enforce stringent waste water controls within environmentally sensitive areas, requiring alternative treatment, secondary treatment and ultra-violet treatment of waste water in sensitive areas.

2.1.3 Goal: To protect the overall water quality of the aquifer and its resources by providing adequate stormwater management and treatment.

Minimum Performance Standards

2.1.3.1 New direct discharge of untreated stormwater, parking-lot runoff, and/or wastewater into marine and fresh surface water and natural wetlands shall not be permitted.

2.1.3.2 Stormwater shall be managed and infiltrated on site to minimize runoff and maximize water quality treatment. Stormwater treatment designs shall be based upon a 25-year 24-hour storm and attain 80% total suspended solids removal and at a minimum be consistent with Massachusetts Stormwater Policy Guidelines.

2.1.3.3 Development and redevelopment shall use best management practices such as vegetated swales and non-structured wetland detention basins for treatment prior to infiltration. Non-structured wetland detention basins and vegetated swales may be counted as open space within Wellhead Protection Areas.

2.1.3.4 Structured detention basins, infiltration basins and galleries may be used in Growth Incentive Zones provided that Minimum Performance Standards for stormwater are met.

2.1.3.5 Infiltration basins or other stormwater leaching structures shall maintain a two-foot separation between maximum high water table and point of infiltration.

2.1.3.6 Development and redevelopment shall submit a stormwater maintenance and operation plan for approval by the Commission. The plan shall, at a minimum, include a schedule for inspection, monitoring, and maintenance and shall identify the party responsible for plan implementation.

2.1.3.7 In Wellhead Protection Areas, stormwater systems for land uses that have a high risk of contaminating groundwater, such as vehicle maintenance areas and loading docks, shall install a mechanical shut-off valve or other flow-arresting device between the catch basin or other stormwater-capture structure draining this area and the leaching structures.

Accomplishments

· The town has adopted Phase II Storm Water Management regulations as required by the US EPA.

· The town subdivision regulations require the use of storm water collection systems, either structural or non-structural as the case may call for.

· The Board of Health maintains stringent controls over business operations within Well-head and Zone II areas.

· Within the Dennisport and West Dennis Village Center Districts the town has adopted the use of rain garden technology for storm water control.

Coastal Resources

2.2.1 Goal: To protect public and traditional maritime interests in the coast and rights for fishing, fowling, and navigation, to preserve and manage coastal areas so as to safeguard and perpetuate their biological, economic, historic, maritime, and aesthetic values, and to preserve, enhance, and where appropriate, expand public access to the shoreline.

Minimum Performance Standards

2.2.1.1 Development and redevelopment along the coastline shall not interfere with existing public access and traditional public rights of way to and environmentally appropriate use of the shoreline.

2.2.1.2 Public access shall be provided at all publicly funded beach nourishment sites where such access will not impair natural resources.

2.2.1.3 Marine infrastructure that supports fisheries or marine transportation should be preserved and protected from conversion to private or recreational uses.

2.2.1.4 Development and redevelopment should reflect the traditional maritime character and/or architecture typical of the area and should be designed to maintain and enhance views of the shoreline from public ways, waterways, access points, and existing development.

2.2.1.5 The construction of walkways, where environmentally acceptable, should be encouraged to enhance shoreline access for the public, including people with disabilities. Such activities should not degrade undisturbed resources or contribute to adverse impacts to habitat, aesthetics, or storm damage prevention.

2.2.1.6 If an existing water-dependent facility is within 250 feet of the mean high water line or shoreward of the first public way, whichever is less, such use should not be changed to a non-water-dependent facility unless an overriding public benefit is provided to accommodate for the loss of the water-dependent use.

2.2.1.7 Development or redevelopment of water-dependent facilities should provide coastal access benefits to the general public. Such access should minimize interference with the water-dependent use.

2.2.1.8 Coastal engineering structures should be designed so as to allow the public to pass along the shore (either above or below the structure) in the exercise of its public trust rights to fishing, fowling, and navigation.

· The town’s coastline falls into two categories, either publicly owned, or previously developed. There is limited privately held land along the coast that is not currently developed. Town acquisitions, such as Sea View Park and in Crowe’s Pasture were made to protect and create new public access points. Similarly, the undevelopment of the former Howlin’ Howies property has created new public access.

· Public beach nourishment takes place at the publicly owned access areas.

· The town recently created its first Marine Zoning District designed to protect the water oriented nature of the properties located within this zoning district.

· The town’s design plans for Bass River Park include elevated walkways that will be ADA compliant. The design will provide the opportunity for public access to near the water’s edge while protecting the resources below the walkway.

Open Space Protection and Recreation

2.5.1 Goal: To preserve and enhance the availability of open space on Cape Cod and provide wildlife habitat, recreation opportunities, and protect the natural resources, scenery, groundwater quality, air quality, and character of Cape Cod, Barnstable County shall strive to protect as open space at least 50% of the developable land remaining as of 1996.

Minimum Performance Standards:

2.5.1.1 Development or redevelopment within Significant Natural Resource Areas, as illustrated on the Cape Cod Significant Natural Resource Areas Map dated January 10, 2002, as amended, shall be clustered away from sensitive resources and maintain a continuous corridor to preserve interior wildlife habitat. Where a property straddles the boundary of an area shown on this map, development shall be clustered outside the boundary. The primary function of these areas is the provision of groundwater recharge, wildlife habitat, open space, scenic roadways, appropriate recreational opportunities, and protection of the Cape’s natural character.

2.5.1.2 Preserved open space within proposed developments shall be designed to be contiguous and interconnecting with adjacent open space, and shall be subject to permanent conservation restrictions. Towns may develop bonus provisions through their local bylaws to allow increased density for preservation of additional high quality open space. Additional guidance on dedication of open space for Developments of Regional Impact can be found in the Guidelines for Calculation and Provision of Open Space in Developments of Regional Impact, Technical Bulletin 94-001, as amended.

2.5.1.5 In the design of developments, significant natural and fragile areas including critical wildlife and plant habitat; water resources such as lakes, rivers, aquifers, shore lands, and wetlands; historic, cultural, and archaeological areas; significant scenic roads and views; unfragmented forest (as mapped by the Cape Cod Commission); and significant landforms shall be protected.

2.5.1.6 Where development is proposed adjacent to land held for conservation and preservation purposes, the development shall be configured so as to prevent adverse impacts to these lands and in a manner that maximizes contiguous open space.

2.5.1.7 Notwithstanding Significant Natural Resource Area designation, where development is proposed in Growth Incentive Zones, the open space requirement shall be reduced to the proportion required for Growth Incentive Zones where a natural resources inventory demonstrates that there are no wetlands, surface water bodies, vernal pools, estimated rare species habitat, agricultural soils, priority natural communities, critical upland areas, public water supply Wellhead Protection Areas, or other unique or fragile habitat within 100 feet of the site boundary.

2.5.1.8 As an incentive toward reducing the generation of impervious areas, protecting open space, and maintaining or improving community character, projects meeting parking requirements under proposed buildings or as a multistoried parking garage may reduce their open space requirement by an amount equivalent to one half the area of each floor of garaged parking provided. Open space credit may not be obtained for parking spaces provided in excess of the minimum number of spaces required by local zoning.

Accomplishments:

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law the town is offering a 10% density bonus for choosing cluster development over grid subdivision.

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law the town is also offering an additional 10% density bonus for locating septic facilities in these clusters in areas identified as the least environmentally sensitive areas.

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law the town is also providing a transfer of development rights which allow a developer to protect off-site natural areas within the Resource Protection District.

· Limited traditional residential development has occurred since 1998 (approximately 30 new residential lots) as opposed to residential development under Chapter 40B (approximately 95 units of housing). Chapter 40B skews traditional build-out analysis and increases demands for town services in a fashion that is hard to plan for.

· Most new traditional residential development has been in the form of cluster developments, thereby preserving open space. Chapter 40B projects on the other hand have created a situation where little or no usable open space exists on a property.

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law the town is requiring the development of Natural Resource Inventories if projects are located within areas that the town has identified as Critical Natural Resource Areas.

· As part of the West Dennis rezoning, the town adopted a waterfront zoning district targeted at preserving a tract of land adjacent to the water for low intensity recreational and water oriented uses. Site (parking and building) coverage in this zoning district was reduced to 25%, with the remaining land area needing to be used in non-intensive fashions.

2.5.2 Goal: To preserve and enhance opportunities for passive and active recreation in the natural environment to meet the needs of both residents and visitors.

Minimum Performance Standards:

2.5.2.1 Recreational needs as identified in the 2000 Statewide Comprehensive

Outdoor Recreation Plan, Local Comprehensive Plans, and local and

regional open space plans should be addressed in the development of projects

on Cape Cod. Such needs include opportunities for wildlife study, expansion of

trail corridors, protection of scenic roadways, development and expansion of

access for the disabled, additional public beaches, and water-based recreational

opportunities with associated parking facilities to the extent these minimize

alteration of natural shorelines and do not harm wildlife habitat.

2.5.2.2 New development should provide suitable recreation and play

areas to meet the needs of the residents of that development such as ball fields,

playgrounds, basketball courts, or bicycle and walking paths.

Accomplishments:

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law projects must study wildlife impacts of development before altering areas identified in the town plan for he area as being a critical habitat area.

· New playground and tennis courts at Johnny Kelley Park.

· Updated accessible playground constructed behind the West Dennis Graded School House off of Pond Street.

· A new pocket park was created on Route 6A in Dennis Village by the removal of a gasoline station.

· A new park is under development at the Bass River on Route 28 through the un-development of a former commercial property.

· Town Recreation activities are well publicized reflecting the significant number of users or Recreation Department facilities. The town makes use of all available media, including local access television, the town website, local newspapers and flyers.

· The town constructs all of its sidewalk projects to serve as bi-walks, joint use facilities for pedestrians and bicyclists.

· The town has acquired a number of priority parcels over the past five years including Melpet Farms on Route 134 (13 acres), Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture (33 acres), and over 93 acres of land by the Dennis Water District to protect the Dennis Water Supply (a significant portion of the town’s acquisitions have also focused on preserving the town water supply as well).

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law the town identified Water Quality as an issue of high concern and developed lot sizes for development in the district based upon the location of property within particular drainage areas, and the potential impacts on water quality include the quality of Quivet Creek, a significant coastal resource shared by the Towns of Dennis and Brewster.

· The town has acquired several parcels of land along the Swan River (8.9 acres) and Swan Pond (3 parcels 9.7 acres) in West Dennis/Dennisport.

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law the town identified Water Quality as an issue of high concern and developed lot sizes for development in the district based upon the location of property within particular drainage areas, and the potential impacts on water quality include the quality of Cole’s Pond and Little Cole’s Pond, two kettle hole ponds that could be significantly deteriorated by inappropriate development densities.

· The Wellhead Protection District regulations of the Board of Health were amended in February 2003 to be in compliance with the MA Wellhead Protection Regulations 310CMR22,21(2).

· The Dennis Water District has acquired 93.31 acres of land for Water Supply Protection Purposes, in addition a large portion of the town’s land acquisitions were for the purpose of water supply protection as well.

· Natural Resource staff, funded through user fees, patrol town open space areas.

· The town has acquired and restored a 0.65 acre park on Route 6A within the Old King’s highway Regional Historic District which was the site of a former gas station.

· The town has acquired the MelPet Farms property on Route 134 for equestrian purposes.

· The town continues to own the Tony Kent Arena skating rink in town.

· The town continues to maintain its boating access points, and as noted below has increased the public’s access to the water.

· The Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture land acquisition includes 700 feet of pond frontage on Cole’s Pond.

· A gift of land on Captain Harding Lane was received by the town with frontage on the Bass River.

· Several waterfront parcels principally along Swan Pond and Swan Pond River have been acquired providing water front access. These acquisitions provide 600 feet of frontage on the pond and 1200 feet of frontage on the river.

Heritage Preservation/Community Character

6.1 Goal: To protect and preserve the important historic and cultural features of the Cape landscape and built environment that are critical components of Cape Cod’s heritage and economy.

6.1.1 An historic structure’s key character-defining features, including the relationship to its site and setting, shall be preserved. Additions and alterations to historic structures shall be consistent with the building’s architectural style and shall not diminish its historic and architectural significance. Removal or alteration of distinguishing original stylistic features or examples of skilled craftsmanship of historic or aesthetic significance shall be prohibited unless the Commission determines that such removal or alteration will not have a significant negative impact on the integrity of the historic property, surrounding historic district, or otherwise distinctive neighborhood.

6.1.2 The distinguishing original features of an historic or cultural landscape shall be preserved. New development adjacent to or within historic or cultural landscapes shall be located to retain the distinctive qualities of such landscapes and shall be designed to maintain the general scale and characterdefining features of such landscapes.

6.1.3 Where development is proposed on or adjacent to known archaeological sites or sites with high archaeological sensitivity as identified by the Massachusetts Historical Commission or the Local Historical Commission during the review process, it shall be configured to maintain and/or enhance such resources where possible. A predevelopment investigation of such sites shall be required early in the site planning process to serve as a guide for layout of the development. Archaeological sites determined eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places shall be preserved and protected from disturbance.

6.1.4 Historic buildings that may be slated for demolition or relocation should be preserved on site and reused or incorporated into the overall design of the project.

6.1.5 The reuse of historic buildings in village centers is encouraged in order to preserve the distinctive characteristics of each Cape Cod village and to promote revitalization of these areas. Where reuse has been conclusively shown to be infeasible, these buildings should be replaced with structures of similar character, mass, proportion, and scale.

6.1.6 Cultural landscapes and archaeologically sensitive areas should be protected through conservation restrictions or preservation restrictions that ensure their long-term preservation.

Accomplishments:

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law the town identified Scenic Vista’s as a high priority for protection. The Zoning By-law establishes a special set of standards, for building size and height, land clearing restrictions and landscaping requirements for all projects located within the identitied scenic vista area. The Scenic Vista area takes into account the visibility of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture area from Route 6A and Paine’s Creek Road in Brewster as well as the beaches of Cape Cod Bay.

· The town has acquired the former Cumberland Farms site on Route 6A (restored to a neighborhood park) and the MelPet Farms property on Route 134 for equestrian purposes. Both of these properties are located in the Old King’s Highway Regional Historic District.

· The town’s acquisition of land, in particular along the Swan Pond and Swan Pond River, protect significant scenic resources.

· As part of the Quivet Neck/Crowe’s Pasture Resource Protection District Zoning By-law the town identified Historic and Archeological Resource areas in need of protection. The Zoning By-law identifies areas of High Archeological and Historical Significance and requires filing a Project Notification Form with the Town and the State prior to any alterations in these areas. The Town or the State could, based upon the submitted Project Notification Form require additional archeological study.

6.2 Goal: To encourage redevelopment of existing structures as an alternative to new construction, and to ensure that development and redevelopment respects the traditions and distinctive character of historic village centers and outlying rural areas consistent with “Designing the Future to Honor the Past, Design Guidelines for Cape Cod,” Technical Bulletin 96-001, as amended.

6.2.1 New development shall be located to preserve the distinctive boundary between village centers and less densely developed areas by focusing on redevelopment/reuse of existing structures or developed sites and on infill construction in designated Growth/Activity Centers and Growth Incentive Zones. Creation or extension of strip development shall not be permitted. Reuse, redevelopment, or infill within existing strip developments in a way that does not extend the linear nature of the development or increase traffic conflicts may be permitted.

6.2.2 New development proposed on local and regional roadways shall be sized such that it can be accommodated without significant changes to the existing character of the roadway. Any necessary structural improvements shall be consistent with the existing character of the roadway, unless the Commission and the community deem alternatives appropriate within the boundaries of Growth/Activity Centers and Growth Incentive Zones.

6.2.3 New development proposed adjacent to scenic roads shall be designed to preserve distinctive features of the scenic road including tree canopy, stone walls, winding road character, and scenic views, and to limit the visibility of new development. New development adjacent to or within scenic open vistas shall be clustered and designed to avoid adverse impact to scenic resources.

Accomplishments:

  • The town of Dennis has adopted a scenic road by-law which governs tree canopy and stone walls in many sections of town. In addition, more than one-half of the town is governed by a Historic District. Between these two devices the scenic and cultural quality of Dennis is actively preserved.
  • Dennis has adopted Village Center By-laws for both Dennisport and West Dennis. These by-laws include strict design standards to be met by development and redevelopment within the villages. The standards tie future architectural styles to those present in the villages in the past.
  • Dennis is the second community in the Commonwealth to adopt a Formula Based Business By-law. The by-law regulates the location and design of businesses which meet certain formula standards.

land-protection-implementation-planEdited June 18, 2009

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